Halo-Halo Dessert Creation for a Delightful Summer Menu

Halo-halo dessert to add to your summer menu.


This unique cold concoction is said to have its roots in the Japanese Occupation when Filipino vendors sought to make a local version of the Japanese kakigori, a dessert of sweet beans served with ice. The concept caught on, and the town of Digman in Cavite has a street of halo-halo restaurants serving up what has become a trendy dessert item, particularly during the hot summer months.  

Halo-halo, which in Filipino means mix-mix, is a colorful treat composed of layers of preserves, sweetened fruits and root crops, layered with jellies, topped with crushed ice and poured over generously with evaporated milk. More modern iterations now have the addition of ube ice cream and maybe a wafer stick or two.  

As with any food around the globe, halo-halo also evolved, and there are many versions, all offering different components. However varied they are, certain essential ingredients must be present. What goes into a traditional halo-halo dessert are ube preserves, sweetened beans, coconut or melon strips, sago pearls, nata de cocogulaman (gelatin), jackfruit, boiled sweetened saba bananas, sweet potatoes, and leche flan   

Purple Hallo Hallo Dessert in white bowl
There are several main components of a traditional halo-halo dessert. (Photo: Shutterstock)

The traditional way to make gulaman or seaweed gelatin means boiling gelatin strips and waiting hours for it to cool and set. With Carte D’Or Almond Flavored Gulamanpreparing the jelly cubes is much more convenient, with a shorter setting time, and its almond flavor gives the jelly its unique taste to add to the halo-halo. When building halo-halo, crush the ice finely to allow easy mixing, and add milk generously on top of it to add creaminess to the heavenly mix

Interestingly, some buffet places in Metro Manila and at vacation destinations are allowing their guests to build their customized version of halo-halo, using the recipe main ingredients.   

You can play around with the presentation of your halo-halo dessert. The traditional way of serving halo-halo is in a tall parfait glass. For expediency, the neighborhood stalls serve them in plastic cups. To make the halo-halo dessert look even more visually appealing, they can also be offered to restaurant diners in young coconut shells or melon halves, with the fruit still inside and meant to be scooped up with the rest of the ingredients


 

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Ingredients

Servings
1

shaved ice

2 cups

saba banana, boiled in sugar syrup

1 cup

sweet potatoes, boiled in sugar syrup

1 cup

young coconut strips, fresh or bottled

1 cup

sweet corn or chickpeas

0.5 cup

evaporated milk

2 cups

cooked Carte D’Or Almond Flavored Gulaman, cut into 1/2 inch cubes

1 cup

ripe jackfruit strips

1 cup

ube halaya

1 cup

ube ice cream

1 scoop

toaster pinipig for sprinkling

Directions

  1. Layer banana, sweet potatoes, coconut, corn, ube, jackfruit, cubed Carte D’Or Almond Flavored Gulaman into four separate glasses, with the crushed ice on top.  

  2. Pour evaporated milk on the ice, top with a scoop of ice cream, and sprinkle with pinipig before serving.

Servings
1

shaved ice

2 cups

saba banana, boiled in sugar syrup

1 cup

sweet potatoes, boiled in sugar syrup

1 cup

young coconut strips, fresh or bottled

1 cup

sweet corn or chickpeas

0.5 cup

evaporated milk

2 cups

cooked Carte D’Or Almond Flavored Gulaman, cut into 1/2 inch cubes

1 cup

ripe jackfruit strips

1 cup

ube halaya

1 cup

ube ice cream

1 scoop

toaster pinipig for sprinkling

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